Republicans block 'rotten' election reform bill in Senate as VP Harris presides over debate

Election reform and DC statehood bills unlikely to pass Senate filibuster

Fox News congressional correspondent Chad Pergram discusses the latest from Capitol Hill on ‘America Reports’

Senate Republicans Tuesday blocked sweeping legislation on election and campaign finance reforms that Democrats said is crucial is ensuring voting rights and saving democracy but Republican blasted as a partisan federal takeover of elections.

The "For the People Act" needed 60 votes to clear a procedural vote in the Senate Tuesday, but Republicans filibustered and killed the legislation from advancing to debate. No Republicans joined with the 50 Democrats on the motion to proceed.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said Republicans won't stand for Democrats' attempt to impose new voting standards on states that would "rig" elections in their favor. He called the substance of the nearly 900-page bill "rotten" to its core.

Republicans took issue with imposing federal standards on state elections that they said would weaken state ID requirements. They also oppose starting a new public financing system for congressional elections and politicizing the Federal Elections Commission that enforces campaign finance laws.

SENATE REPUBLICANS POISED TO BLOCK DEMOCRATS' SWEEPING ELECTION REFORM BILL

Even GOP moderate Sen. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska said she couldn't support the "partisan federal takeover of the election system." In a floor speech, she said she'd back elements of the bill and will co-sponsor the separate John Lewis Voting Rights Act, but can't back Democrats' "one-size-fits-all" reforms.

Democrats, with the White House on their side, framed the legislation as an urgent priority to save democracy in the face of GOP efforts in state legislatures around the country to pass "voter suppression laws" in the wake of former President Trump's 2020 election loss and unsubstantiated claims of widespread voter fraud.

"Democracy is in peril, here, in America," President Biden's White House said in a statement Tuesday supporting the bill. "The right to vote – a sacred right in this country – is under assault with an intensity and an aggressiveness we have not seen in a long time."

Voting rights have been such a concern for the White House that Vice President Kamala Harris presided over the debate on the Senate floor Tuesday evening.

Vice President Kamala Harris presides over the Senate Tuesday June 22 as Republicans blocked Democrats' signature voting reform legislation.  (CSPAN)

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y. accused the GOP of being "afraid" to debate the merits of voting rights because they'd be forced to defend their efforts to disenfranchise voters.

"Republicans across the country are deliberately targeting all the ways that younger, poorer, nonwhite and typically Democratic voters access the ballot," Schumer said Tuesday. "Republicans claim they’re making it easier to vote and harder to cheat in an election; but in reality, they are making it harder to vote and easier to cheat an election."

The "For the People Act" was numbered H.R. 1 and S.1 in the House and Senate to signify it was the top priority of Democratic leadership. The bill already passed the House with no GOP support.

HOUSE DEMOCRATS PASS EXTENSIVE VOTING AND CAMPAIGN FINANCE REFORM BILL, H.R. 1

The voting rights legislation, if enacted, would take aim at big-dollar donors and dark money in politics by requiring additional disclosure of campaign donors and disclaimers on political advertising. Presidential candidates would also be required to release their tax returns.

It would set up a new 6-1 public matching financing system for congressional elections to encourage more grassroots donations and require states to adopt independent redistricting commissions to prevent partisan gerrymandering.

And the legislation would set basic standards for states to run elections, such as mandating at least 15 days of early voting, setting up automatic voter registration, and permitting the use of student IDs or sworn written statements in states that have voter identification requirements.

Marisa Schultz Fox News