Poll: Plurality Say People Should 'Continue Wearing Masks in Public' Even After Being Fully Vaccinated

A plurality of American adults believe fully vaccinated individuals should “continue wearing masks in public” even after being fully vaccinated, a Rasmussen Reports survey released Tuesday showed.

Over 105 million people in the U.S. have been “fully vaccinated,” representing 31.8 percent of the U.S. population, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) May 3 data. With a growing number of Americans getting vaccinated, the CDC released updated guidance for those individuals, which continues to instruct them to wear masks in certain social settings, despite their status as fully vaccinated.

The Rasmussen survey, conducted April 29 and May 2, asked respondents, “Should people who have been fully vaccinated against COVID-19 continue wearing masks in public places?”

Forty-nine percent said yes while 42 percent said no. Predictably, opinions are sharply divided on party lines, as a majority of Republicans, 67 percent, said they should not continue wearing masks in public, while 75 percent of Democrats said such individuals should.

Respondents were also asked if people who have already had the virus but recovered should continue to wear a mask in public. A majority, or 54 percent, said yes, compared to 35 percent who said no. Again, options are split among party lines, as 77 percent of Democrats said yes, they should continue to wear a mask, and 56 percent of Republicans said no.

The survey also asked respondents to gauge how much longer Americans will be required to wear masks in public places. One-third said “six months to a year” followed by 30 percent who said “less than six months,” 10 percent who said “at least 18 months,” 9 percent who said “for the next couple of years,” and 6 percent who said “indefinitely.”

It also found 50 percent expressing the belief that America is “winning the war against the coronavirus.” Just over a quarter, 26 percent, said “no,” America is not winning the war against the virus.

The survey, taken April 29 and May 2 among 1,000 U.S. adults, has a margin of error of +/- 3 percent.

Hannah Bleau